Raiding Progress

How Ralph Nader and the Public Interest Movement Undermined American Liberalism

REFERENCES

1. Dorothy Ross, The Origins of American Social Science (New York: Cambridge University Press, 1990).

2. Elizabeth Sanders, Roots of Reform: Farmers, Workers, and the American State, 1877–1917 (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1999).

3. Quoted in Simon Lazarus, The Genteel Populists (New York: Holt, Rinehart, and Winston, 1974), 37, cited in David Vogel, Kindred Strangers: The Uneasy Relationship Between Politics and Business in America (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1996), 153.

4. John Chamberlain, The American Stakes (New York; Carrick and Evans, 1940), 31–32, cited in Daniel T. Rodgers, Contested Truths: Keywords in American Politics since Independence (New York: Basic Books, 1987), 208.

5. Ralph Nader and Donald K. Ross, Action for a Change: A Student’s Manual for Public Interest Organizing (New York: Grossman Publishers, 1971).

6. Robert A. Kagan, Adversarial Legalism: The American Way of Law (Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 2001), 48.

7. Ibid, 224.

8. Michael McCann, Taking Reform Seriously: Public Interest Liberalism (Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1986), 64.

9. Jeremy A. Rabkin, “The Secret Life of the Private Attorney General,” Law and Contemporary Problems 61, no. 1 (1998).

10. Kagan.

11. Ibid, 26–29.

12. Charles W. Calomiris and Stephen H. Haber, Fragile by Design: The Political Origins of Banking Crises and Scarce Credit (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2014), 219. 

13. Ibid, 221.

14. Isabelle Groc, “Shooting Owls to Save Other Owls,” National Geographic, July 19, 2014, http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2014/07/140717-spotted-owls-barred-shooting-logging-endangered-species-science/.

15. Tim Morrison, “Ralph Nader, Fiction Writer,” TIME, September 23, 2009, http://content.time.com/time/nation/article/0,8599,1925576,00.html.